Mr. Caution (mr_caution) wrote in arclig,
Mr. Caution
mr_caution
arclig

rebroadcast re-entry: Circumshot navigator: Dr. Salvo Magnificent/Rudy Fabrizio

AH-64 APACHE HELICOPTER
Card 164 from 2nd Series
Color landscape visual. This is one of those really mean-looking helicoptors. Not the kind you see landing at the heliports just off the FDR on the lower East Side, or the kind that you see checking the traffic and reporting back. These are the kind the bad guy sees in an action movie just before he realizes that the good guy is piloting the thing and the next thing you know th ebad guy is eating a missile for his last meal! Yeah! But speaking of missiles, there are eight big ones on this thing, then what looks like another launcher on each side that each carries 19 more small missiles for a total of 54 missiles. Then there's a big-ass gun in the middle on the thing's underbelly. The sky behind this baby is stark white. No blue skies could carry a death machine of this magnitude. No siree bob...this helicopter kicks to much ass to fly the friendly skies!
Back Card text:
AH-64 APACHE HELICOPTER
The AH-64 Apache attack helicopter boast a weapons load of more than 3,000 lbs. It carries an M230 30 mm "chain" gun that can fire up to 750 rounds per minute, and 16 Hellfire anti-tank missiles or four Stinger air-to-air missiles. Critical sections such as the cockpit are armored, and the helicopter carries three types of radar jamming and diverting devices.
©1991 The Topps Company, Inc.

TOMAHAWK CRUISE MISSILE
Card 167 from 2nd Series
Color portrait visual. A few fluffy white clouds in the pale blue sky greet this big black missile with an orange base as it takes off into the air, destined for some target probably half a world away. The exhaust is a white hot flame that disperses into a white mist of fumes. It looks, in this picture, like the missile is coming straight out of the sea, a projectile from Poseiden's trident aimed at the heart of his adversary. But you can't really see what (or who) is firing it.
Back Card text:
TOMAHAWK CRUISE MISSILE
The Tomahawk is a 20 ft. air-to-ground cruise missile comprised of a guidance system, a conventional warhead, both jet and rocket fuel, an engine, and a booster rocket. After launch it locates its target and adjusts its path by following pre-programmed landmarks. The Tomahawk can be programmed to hug the ground at altitudes under 100 feet and has a range of up to 1,500 miles.
©1991 The Topps Company, Inc.

STOPPING THE OIL'S FLOW
Card 170 from 2nd Series
Two color landscape visuals on this card. Both show the sea, sky and smoke. The sea is on fire and it looks like there's scaffolding or structural remnants smoldering and aflame in the top image. The smoke is black and impenetrable. The smoke looks like it could go on forever. The smoke is draining from somewhere deep inside the earth and flowing from out of the sea and into the sky and further up past our outer atmospheres and into space beyond. Once out in space it refuses to disperse and take on the accepted role of interstellar debris and dust. The physical laws of diffusion mean nothing to this thick, mucousy cloud of black filth. It remains a solid object through the deepest reaches of space, pouring out and through time.
Back Card text:
STOPPING THE OIL'S FLOW
After Sadaam Hussein ordered Iraqi forces to open oil spigots at Kuwait's off shore loading sight, Allied forces had to contend with the worst oil spill in history — approximately 250 million gallons of crude oil. The U.S. directed an air strike at two of the pipe manifolds to inhibit the out-flow of oil. The bombs hit their mark, but some oil continues to flow into the Gulf, gravely endangering the delicate balance of the marine environment.
©1991 The Topps Company, Inc.

ANTI-CHEMICAL GEAR
Card 171 from 2nd Series
Color landscape visual. Sand, man, shadow and sky. Two American soldiers approach the camera, walking steadily with their rifles drawn but pointed safely in either direction, the one on the right to the right, the one on left to the left. Their camo is darker and more severe than in other images. It doesn't have the beige and tan tones and cartoonish depictions of rocky terrain. They are covered, head to toe, in gear. They wear gasmasks of some kind that make them appear uniform and alien, anonymous and emotionless and almost mechanical. They are protected from the chemicals, one would suppose, and looking for whoever released the chemicals so they can shoot that person dead. They are sentient and advancing, ready for combat and completely insulated from the hidden killers that can float unseen into the mucous membranes and soft tissues of the human body and latch onto the important parts, turning them to useless mush before causing total loss of body functions and eventually death. Or perhaps these chemical weapons attach themselves and then sit idle, waiting for the proper moment to unleash a maelstrom of genetic interference with the brave soldier's offspring. Either way, these soldiers are safe. They're under the layers of plastic and space-age fabrics that are impenetrable to even the tiniest iota of chemical death.
Back Card text:
ANTI-CHEMICAL GEAR
Iraq has threatened to employ chemical warfare during the War in the Gulf. This has necessitated that Allied soldiers be issued chemical protective gear, including gas masks and anti-chemical suits. They are also given critical training in the use and wearing of this equipment. There are several types of chemical weapons that have the potential to asphyxiate, blind, burn and affect nervous systems.
©1991 The Topps Company, Inc.

TENT CITY
Card 175 from 2nd Series
Color landscape visual. Uniform army beige barracks made from burlap or denim or whatever cloth they use as far as the eye can see. And above them only blue sky. In the foreground, it loks like the nearest row of tents sits near a street or avenue. And across the street from the tents a few small figures have gathered, army men in fatigues. They stand in a little goup and chat, like housewives might as they stroll through their subdivision walking their dogs midway through the morning. The husbands at work, the kids are at school, the soaps haven't startyed and it's too early to drink. So they walk their dogs and gossip. Maybe they carry those heavy-hand weights to deliver the appearance of exercise. Maybe these camo-clad army men have their heavy-hand weihts or hand guns or something. They are standing and gossiping about the latest dish about that new Corporal or Major or whoever and how they had the gaul and audacity to say whatever to whoever in the mess hall last night. In most parts of America, every house in a subdivision development neighborhood looks the same. Here in tent city every tent looks the same.
Back Card text:
Most soldiers participating in Operation Desert Storm are housed in tent colonies like this one, forming mini-cities across the desert. These tents serve as sleeping, eating and meeting quarters, and as medical units, storage facilities and communications stations. Soldiers sleep on cots in these temporary barracks.
©1991 The Topps Company, Inc.
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